In 2013, Norwegian authorities tightened the regulation of the au pair programme, to prevent trafficking in human beings (THB) for labour exploitation. Norwegian citizens who abuse the au pair programme will be placed 'in quarantine' that forbids them to employ a new au pair for a certain period of time.

Like in other countries, Norway’s au pair programme is aimed at giving its participants a chance to learn the national language and gain insight into the country’s culture. Au pairs live with host families who are supposed to cover their living expenses, pay for Norwegian lessons and offer a small income in return for a maximum of 30 hours a week of housework.

Unfortunately, some au pairs in Norway, for instance those from the Philippines, are put to work performing household tasks, working long hours and receiving very little money.